Back-to-back lunar eclipses appear in one night’s view

A partial lunar eclipse was visible in North and South America, Europe, Africa, and the Middle East and parts of western Asia on Thursday, but it did not reach the moon’s full phase. NASA…

Back-to-back lunar eclipses appear in one night’s view

A partial lunar eclipse was visible in North and South America, Europe, Africa, and the Middle East and parts of western Asia on Thursday, but it did not reach the moon’s full phase. NASA expects partial eclipses of the moon to continue into Saturday.

The national space agency said the full eclipse will take place next Tuesday, Jan. 21.

Astronomers said the moon would have turned from a bright red color due to high atmospheric oxygen levels throughout the evening. This effect, known as the so-called “bone of fire,” also occurs during the July and December full moons.

The blacked-out moon is normally quite noticeable, with those viewing the passing events using a telescope discovering a scene that often resembles a large, deep crimson sky.

Closer to Earth, the eclipse creates dark hues on the horizon that can be seen from countries not covered by the moon’s lower limb.

The moon appeared much darker from below Western Europe and Africa, according to NASA.

More than 11,000 people shared images of the evening on Twitter, including some from NASA’s correspondents across the globe.

There’s an eclipse tonight! Can’t wait to see it live on Periscope! https://t.co/MFdgzibFey — Katie Russum (@KatieRussum) December 20, 2018

One Twitter user captured the eclipse without looking at a telescope, and said it felt like he was “watching the moon freeze in moonlight.”

I don’t know if NASA knows this but I just casually looked up at the moon and it began to redden, I honestly believe it was as simple as that (delightful and subtle effect of atmosphere). Just watched without viewing a telescope though, it felt like I was watching the moon freeze in moonlight. It was quite incredible pic.twitter.com/ZIPlsmTiF2 — The Sociable (@the_society) December 20, 2018

Another person from the East Coast spotted a lunar eclipse in the evening sky but didn’t need a telescope to make it happen.

“Not really sure how to explain it…the moon started to blur as it came closer to the Earth, and I happened to be at the exact time I noticed something was happening that was alien to my experience. It was crystal clear. I saw the shadows of the edges of the moon, and it looked like a kraken coming to get my favorite adult beverage,” r wrote on Twitter.

Not really sure how to explain it…the moon started to blur as it came closer to the Earth, and I happened to be at the exact time I noticed something was happening that was alien to my experience. It was crystal clear. I saw the shadows of the edges of the moon, and it looked like a kraken coming to get my favorite adult beverage. pic.twitter.com/aMKXr0ECD2 — Annacoled Golze (@AnnacoledGolze) December 20, 2018

They are called lunar eclipses because they occur when the moon moves across the face of the Earth, causing it to become darker as it makes its passage across our planet’s shadow.

According to New York City-based astronomy club Planet Hunters, the moon should be visible for just a few hours, from sunset to 10 p.m. EST.

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